An examination of home burial by robert frost

The poem, Home Burial by Robert Frostopens with Amy, a woman whose son has recently died, about to come down to the stairs from her room.

An examination of home burial by robert frost

She withdrew, shrinking from beneath his arm That rested on the banister, and slid downstairs; And turned on him with such a daunting look, He said twice over before he knew himself: Oh, I don't need it!

I must get out of here. I must get air. Don't go to someone else this time. I won't come down the stairs.

I don't know how to speak of anything So as to please you. But I might be taught, I should suppose. I can't say I see how. A man must partly give up being a man With womenfolk.

We could have some arrangement By which I'd bind myself to keep hands off Anything special you're a-mind to name. Though I don't like such things 'twixt those that love.

Two that don't love can't live together without them. But two that do can't live together with them. Don't carry it to someone else this time. Tell me about it if it's something human. Let me into your grief. I'm not so much Unlike other folks as your standing there Apart would make me out.

Give me my chance. I do think, though, you overdo it a little. What was it brought you up to think it the thing To take your mother-loss of a first child So inconsolably -- in the face of love. You'd think his memory might be satisfied " "There you go sneering now!

An examination of home burial by robert frost

You make me angry. I'll come down to you. God, what a woman! And it's come to this, A man can't speak of his own child that's dead. If you had any feelings, you that dug With your own hand -- how could you? I thought, Who is that man?

I didn't know you.Robert Frost was born on March 26, , in San Francisco, where his father, William Prescott Frost Jr., and his mother, Isabelle Moodie, had moved from Pennsylvania shortly after marrying. "Home Burial" is one of Robert Frost's longest poems, and it can also be considered one of his most emotionally disturbing ones.

"Home Burial," published in , tells the story of a married couple fighting after their baby has died. It's written mostly in dialogue, so it sounds like real people talking. But this is no ordinary conversation.

Home Burial by Robert Frost Prev Article Next Article The poem, Home Burial by Robert Frost, opens with Amy, a woman whose son has recently died, about to come down to the stairs from her room.

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Robert Frost was born on March 26, , in San Francisco, where his father, William Prescott Frost Jr., and his mother, Isabelle Moodie, had moved from Pennsylvania shortly after marrying.

After the death of his father from tuberculosis when Frost was eleven years old, he moved with his mother and sister, Jeanie, who was two years younger, to Lawrence, Massachusetts. Home Burial by Robert caninariojana.com saw her from the bottom of the stairs Before she saw him.

She was starting down Looking back over her shoulder at some fear.

SparkNotes: Frost’s Early Poems: Home Burial

She took a doubtful. Page/5(15). Home Burial by Robert caninariojana.com saw her from the bottom of the stairs Before she saw him. She was starting down Looking back over her shoulder at some fear.

She took a doubtful. Page/5(15).

Poetry Analysis: “Home Burial“ by Robert Frost